Fair Easter chocolate: from Easter Bunny to Easter Boss

An irrepressible urge to devour a chocolate Easter bunny? We get it. Chocolate endorphins boost your day. When that cocoa bomb (or Easter egg) is made with respect for people and nature, the chocolate party can begin. 

An irrepressible urge to devour a chocolate Easter bunny? We get it. Chocolate endorphins boost your day. When that cocoa bomb (or Easter egg) is made with respect for people and nature, the chocolate party can begin. 

Bite to Fight

Chocolate often remains a bitter story. On the one hand, you have some chocolate giants like Nestlé, which brings in most of the $120 billion in the chocolate industry. On the other, you have cocoa farmers like in Côte d’Ivoire who get only a third of the amount needed for food, clothing, healthcare, and a roof over their heads. However, a living income is a human right.   

A low price for cocoa also means that many parents cannot afford the school fees. The direct consequence is that their children do not go to school. The ‘Bite to Fight’ project provides an extra premium so that cocoa farmers can break the vicious circle of low pay and few opportunities. Bite to Fight fights for a living income.

Breaking vicious circles

Bite to Fight also breaks another vicious circle. When a cocoa orchard yields less, a new area will be deforested to make way for cocoa fields. Between 1990 and 2015, 85% of Ivory Coast’s forests disappeared. 30% of this was due to cocoa cultivation (source: Mighty Earth, 2017).   

Besides sustainable farming techniques that are good for the planet, tree preservation is rewarded with Bite to Fight. For every year that a tree remains, the cocoa farmer receives an extra premium. Good for the planet, double check.